Tag: S2D

CAN SQL SERVER FAILOVER CLUSTER INSTANCES RUN ON S2D TWICE AS FAST AS SQL SERVER BASIC AVAILABILITY GROUPS ON STORAGE SPACES? SUMMARY

Since I’m done with measuring SQL Server Basic Availability Groups (BAG) on Storage Spaces and SQL Server Failover Cluster Instances (FCI) on Storage Spaces Direct (S2D) performance, I can write the most interesting part in this series: performance comparison.


Can SQL Server Failover Cluster Instances run on S2D twice as fast as SQL Server Basic Availability Groups on Storage Spaces? Part 2: Studying FCI performance

It is the second part of my research on SQL Server Basic Availability Groups (BAG) and SQL Server Failover Cluster Instances (FCI) performance. Before, I measured SQL Server BAG performance on Storage Spaces. Today, I study the performance of SQL Server FCI on S2D, trying to prove that this thing can run 2 times faster than SQL Server BAG on Storage Spaces.


Can SQL Server Failover Cluster Instance run on S2D twice as fast as SQL Server Basic Availability Groups on Storage Spaces? Part 1: Studying BAG performance

Some time ago, I published here comparison of SQL Server Failover Cluster Instances (FCI) and SQL Server Basic Availability (BAG) performance while having them run on top of StarWind Virtual SAN. Today, I measure SQL Server BAG performance on Storage Spaces. The next part sheds light on SQL Server FCI performance on S2D. Can I squeeze two times more TPM out of SQL Server FCI on S2D than SQL Server BAG can provide on Storage Spaces?


How Can I Replace a Failed Physical Disk on Storage Spaces Direct in Windows Server 2016?

So, we all know about Microsoft’s Storage Spaces Direct (S2D to put it simple) by now. It’s the feature introduced in Microsoft Server 2016 (Datacenter Edition) that pools together server’s storage allowing to build…that’s right: highly available and easily scalable software-defined storage systems. In this article, I’m gonna talk about not as much about its fault-tolerance characteristics themselves, but some hands-on experience, namely: how to replace a failed disk.